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    What We're Listening To & Watching

   
             
   

What a year it's been! There have been so many great releases we've barely had time to update this page (but if you watch our Facebook and Twitter feeds, then you've seen these reviews already). Everything here is worth your attention if you're into the particular genre, or are looking to branch out into some new listening areas... well, with the exception of one of these titles, anyway (you'll have to read the reviews to figure out which one wasn't quite as great as the band's former output).

Gary NumanSteven WilsonRevolution SaintsUdi LevyRiverdogsBlackfieldTokyo Motor FistDef LeppardHouse of LordsPrincipe ValienteMadonna

 

   
   

Gary Numan Savage (Songs from a Broken World)

Genre:

Electrtonic Rock, Industrial

Musicianship: 3.5
Songwriting: 4.0
Production & Engineering: 4.0
Vibe: 4.0
Overall Rating: 4 Stars3.89

Gary Numan - SavageHere in my car, I can't get enough of the fantastic new record from electronic music pioneer, Gary Numan. Savage (Songs from a Broken World) is easily one of the best records of Numan's entire career. Yes, it's that good.

Numan found great success with his 2013, Splinter (Songs From A Broken Mind), and it must have seemed daunting to top what was perceived by many as a return to form. But surpass it, Numan has done.

Most artists with 30-40 year careers tend to wither and fade over time, but just as Numan had done in the past, he continues to innovate and evolve. He keeps getting better! From his punk and new wave roots, his sound has evolved over the decades, veering into pop territory for a bit and then landing in the heavy, industrial side of electronic rock. On Savage, Numan has achieved an incredible vibe that combines the energy of modern industrial rock with the passion and cinematic texture that has made his classic works both enduring and legendary.

Truly, listening to Savage is like absorbing a film soundtrack. It is cinematic, textural, full of longing and tension, and the lyrical content is as riveting as any of his classic works. The former android now looks to the dystopian future, where global warming has destroyed the planet. Each song is a vignette into some piece of what's going on in that future, and the collection as a whole was inspired by a novel that Numan has had in the works for some time (but is as yet unfinished).

The first single, "My Name is Ruin," is a perfect example of what's in store for the listener with this record. It's heavy without being too heavy. It's full of layers and layers of sonic tapestry, mournful, haunting vocals, and… a reference we haven't used in years… it's full of cold metal rhythms. The synth work and electronic noises are as good as anything this master has ever recorded. Tracks like "And it Began With You" are epic, with the tension and passion Numan fans will recognize and revel in from decades ago. It nearly brought us to tears. Classic, deep, emotional Gary Numan at his absolute best.

Our love affair is just as strong with the electronic rock piece, "When The World Comes Apart," which is so catchy that it probably has Trent Reznor dancing around the house when he thinks nobody is watching. This is definitely a listening record, as a number of the songs are down tempo, soundtrack-ish pieces that take time building to epic climaxes. If you're ready for a fantastic sonic journey that is dark and passionate, you won't be disappointed. Numan has never sounded so good vocally, and we noticed him incorporating some new, unusual melodies that we've never heard before in his singing (and we know his entire catalog quite well). Ade Fenton's production and Nathan Boddy's mixing contribute to the fantastic listening experience. Savage delivers a sonic treat to your ears. Indeed, Savage sooths the electronic beast.

—SK


 

Revolution Saints Light In The Dark

Genre:

Progressive Rock

Musicianship: 4.0
Songwriting: 4.0
Production & Engineering: 4.0
Vibe: 4.0
Overall Rating: 4 Stars

Revolution Saints — Light In The DarkFrom the very first note and downbeat of this record, we loved everything about it! Alessandro Del Vecchio (Hardline/JORN) produced these songs masterfully. A solid AOR effort, the production is top notch and allows the songs to shine through in a way seldom heard today. It's hard to believe this band effort was recorded individually in multiple studios across the globe, given that the songs sound as tight as a band who have been playing together for decades.

Doug Aldrich (Whitesnake/Dio/Dead Daisies) is no stranger to dazzling his audience with top rate playing and sound, but this album might be our favorite work of his to date. The guitars are appropriately forward in the mix and just brutally, perfectly executed. We typically experience guitarists who either play for the song or shred their eyeballs out. Aldrich has the experience to strike a fine balance between the two, and from beginning to end, he melts faces while retaining the songs hooks and harmonic structures. These are the marks of an excellent guitar player. He dazzles without ever getting boring.

Deen Castronovo (Journey) delivers passionate, powerful vocals on the recordings just as if he were singing on a new Journey record. As a matter of fact, nothing against Arnel Pineda, but we think Castronovo is the stronger vocalist. Singing drummers rarely work out, but damn, this is good. Really good. The Steve Perry/ Journey influences cannot be ignored, and that style of AOR is reborn here with a breath of fresh air.

As if this wasn't already enough, Jack Blades (Night Ranger/Damn Yankees)—who typically needs no introduction, provides excellent vocal harmony support and keeps the low end locked in with the straightforward-yet-thunderous grooves of the record.

More records should be made to such a degree of excellence. Maybe there'd be more interest in the craft of being in a band, touring and making great music if this was the case. Bands both big league and small be on notice: Revolution Saints set the AOR benchmark high, and it will not be an easy one to top.

—BS


 
Riverdogs — California
Genre:

Hard Rock, AOR

Musicianship: 3.5
Songwriting: 2.5
Production & Engineering: 3.0
Vibe: 3.5
Overall Rating: 3 Stars3.13

Riverdogs — California'80s rockers, Riverdogs, are back with their long awaited 5th release, California. Our readership is certainly familiar with guitarist Vivian Campbell. Although his guitar duties are sometimes hamstrung in Def Leppard due to both the material and sharing guitar duties with Phil Collen, it is a pleasure to hear Vivian cut loose here, the way he did back in his Dio days. The explosive energy and heart in his playing on this record is unapologetic and raw, yet delivered in such a way as to evoke mastery of the guitar that only years of experience can accomplish.

California delivers straight-ahead hard rock, and we enjoy the driving elements at play here, but we really wanted to hear a few more intoxicating hooks on this record. Sure, the songs all conveyed a message and came to logical points, but addictive, "I can listen to this song all day"-type hooks just didn't happen for us. Rob Lamothe's vocal delivery was convincing and professional, but we would have loved to hear a little more range out of him rather than remaining solely within his comfort zone. The blues rock-based approach works fine for this body of songs, but a more layered and polished performance could have lifted this record even higher.

The production is generally good; modern with plenty of well-controlled thump and cut, and attention was obviously paid to the drums production, with a good, meaty kick and cutting snare sound. The guitars are exactly how we like them: forward in the mix, which is great given that the most emotive performances on this record tend to come from the guitar solos. The guitar tone was raw and clear, with minimal effects, and was extremely pleasing to the ear.

Although the vocal performance may not have lived up to the caliber of the guitar delivery, this is a solid band delivering a strong performance with character and a certain uniqueness in the delivery that solidifies the band's identity.

—BS


 

 
Tokyo Motor Fist — Tokyo Motor Fist
Genre:

Progressive rock, Hard Rock

Musicianship: 3.5
Songwriting: 3.0
Production & Engineering: 3.0
Vibe: 4.0
Overall Rating: 3.5 Stars3.38

Tokyo Motor FirstPre-millennial rockers, Ted Poley (Danger Danger) and Steve Brown (Trixter), are still alive and well, touring with their bands of '80s fame.  It's always interesting to hear artists from different bands getting together to put out a "super group" CD, and we have heard varying results. Tokyo Motor Fist was one such project that came across our MusicPlayers.com desk. Being pre-millennial, East coast rockers ourselves, we had high hopes for local NY/NJ successes like Poley and Brown, and knowing that they were backed up by veterans Greg Smith and Chuck Burgi (both of Rainbow fame) holding down the rhythm section, we suspected something fun was going to leap from our speakers, and we were not disappointed.

Right out of the starting gate was Poley's impressive vocal delivery and familiar tone. His voice is timeless, in that it has had no appreciable deterioration over some thirty years of hearing him blast through our car speakers (the only thing that has changed is our cars have gotten nicer). Fast paced rockers like "Love Me Insane" showcase his often playful approach to melody and song structure, while the track also features multi-layered guitars with suggestive melodic content along with a solid, distinct rhythms. We particularly enjoyed Steve Brown's guitar solo and crafty use of octave-jumping runs.

The song "Love," showcases Poley's mastery of the ballad and just how well-suited his voice is to the style. The straightforward track was as simple and pretty as it needed to be in order to let the song and musicianship shine. The phase-type effects on what sounded like a heavily processed vocal track added a nice touch. Steve Brown's simple guitar solo showed an authority and style only achieved by years of experience and mastery of the instrument.

The con brio piece, "You're My Revolution," has a great, driving feel with a steady double kick. Here, Brown's guitar playing really shines through, taking us home with fast-yet-well-crafted and articulate licks, and some great rhythm work as well. Even the bass had a chance to shine in the bridge section with a tasteful featured melody, an artistic risk in AOR material, where the bass and drums need to hold down the often more-featured guitar and vocal lines. Well played.

Another standout, the track, "Put Me To Shame" makes no apologies. This is AOR, and here it is in spades! We loved the wicked, palm-muted, syncopated riff, prominently harmonized vocal lines, and a split verse where it started laid back and got bigger and bigger until it grabbed us with a full-on monster chorus. 

Assuming your kids aren't embarrassed by your penchant for classic '80s hair metal, this album is fun for the whole family.

—BS


 
House of Lords — Saint of The Lost Souls
Genre:

AOR, Hard Rock

Musicianship: 4.0
Songwriting: 3.5
Production & Engineering: 4.0
Vibe: 3.5
Overall Rating: 4 Stars3.75

House of Lords — Saint of The Lost SoulsWow. Let's start this review of House of Lord's tenth studio album with the album closer, "The Other Option," because if this song doesn't have you flailing away in crazy spasms of rocking delight, you clearly have no appreciation for catchy AOR rock and may as well stop reading further.

I'm trying to write this review, but my head keeps bouncing up and down… better stop listening to this record for a bit. Whew! So here we find Saint of The Lost Souls, and it might be one of the best records in the vast House of Lords catalog. James Christian's commanding vocals are equaled by guitarist Jimi Bell's killer melodic shredding. But you can't single Bell out any more than the exceptional keyboard work which also happens to be performed by vocalist, Christian. He played keys throughout, other than on the rocking album opener, "Harlequin," which features keyboardist Michele Luppi from Whitesnake.

Chris Tristram and BJ Zampa provide a tasteful, solid rhythm section delivery, and we love how this band runs the gamut from catchy arena rock to subtle tinges of progressive showmanship. Part of what sets House of Lords apart from so many other AOR groups is their obvious musicianship skills that put them in league with prog rock masters, but also the way that they can take catchy hooks and major key passages and keep them sounding interesting in a rock world dominated by dropped tunings and minor-key angst. Yes, they have some great, dark, goth-tinged metal moments as well, but the overall vibe leans mostly in the AOR direction.

With high production values accompanying the high-caliber songwriting and performance, it's hard to pick specific favorites in between the opening and closing bookends of "Harlequin" and "The Other Option," but "Reign of Fire" just started to play and my body is moving involuntarily again. If I punch my fist in the air but nobody is around to see it, does that mean I didn't' really rock out? This will probably come to be regarded as one of the best AOR albums of 2017. Rightfully so.

—SK


 
 
 


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Steven Wilson To The Bone
Genre:

Progressive Rock

Musicianship: 4.0
Songwriting: 4.0
Production & Engineering: 4.0
Vibe: 4.0
Overall Rating: 4 Stars

Steven Wilson — To The BoneSteven Wilson needs little introduction to our serious musician audience, and if all goes well with publicity efforts behind his latest solo work, To The Bone, he'll need little introduction to the world of mainstream rock and pop fans soon enough. In fact, we're done making reference to his legacy band work, and we won't even mention that other great band he's part of, because with this being his fifth full-length solo release, this is an artist whose body of work is expansive even without all of the other incredible work he's created over the past couple of decades.

Getting right to the point, To The Bone is one of the finest records that Wilson has written and recorded, and it's sure to win new fans thanks to the catchy hooks and pop rock attitude that is a marked departure from his recent progressive rock masterpieces. Old school, die hard, tunnel vision, classic prog fans may not appreciate the happier side of Wilson, but fans of '70s pop, '80s new wave, and fans of early Porcupine Tree music (oops!) will love this musical evolution.

The infectiously catchy single, "Permanating," should cement Wilson's place among history's greatest pop songwriters, with a vibe that straddles a fine line between Electric Light Orchestra and Abba. We love the classic rock meets Deadwing-era Porcupine Tree vibe in songs like "Nowhere Now" and the Blackfield vibe of the album closer, "Song of Unborn." Damn. We just can't escape bringing up his other musical output, can we?

To The Bone is full of great modern rock, too, with a new wave inspiration that obviously came from the likes of Peter Gabriel, Kate Bush, Talk Talk, and other "refined" British pop music makers of that era. But instead of rehashing the past, the vibe here is contemporary. "Pariah" and "Song of I" are just two great examples of Wilson's ever expanding musical vocabulary, with outstanding female vocals provided by Ninet Tayeb and Sophie Hunger.

Unlike the previous few Steven Wilson records that were rehearsed and recorded with his live band, To The Bone was written and recorded mostly as a solo project, with Wilson performing most of the guitar, bass, and keyboard duties, though it does have plenty of guest appearances instrumentally from members of Wilson's live band plus a wide range of additional players. As such, he did a great job of refreshing the overall sound, making things far more contemporary sounding than his recent solo records. This one is an absolute gem, one of the best in his expansive body of work. You need no previous familiarity with his catalog to dive right into To The Bone. It's easily one of the best records of the year, and one of Wilson's finest, with many layers of beauty to unravel with each passing listen.

—SK


 

Udi Levy Addictive Substance

Genre:

Instrumental shred, fusion

Musicianship: 4.0
Songwriting: 3.0
Production & Engineering: 3.0
Vibe: 3.5
Overall Rating: 3.5 Stars3.38

Udy Levi — Addictive SubstanceNew Yorker Udi Levy is back with a new offering for 2017, continuing his foray into the world of shred, having already proven himself as a world-renowned fusion and jazz guitarist. Bringing jazz know-how to instrumental guitar rock definitely lifts the material above the noise of pointless wankery, and Levy's bold approach to shred is both refreshing and joyful to listen to.

Given his deep jazz and fusion roots, we had high expectations for Addictive Substance, and the material often delivered. The CD starts off with a strong theme and a great hook on the song "Sex Drive," not unlike what artists such as Joe Satriani have built entire careers around. Levy's way of masterfully phrasing legato along with pinch harmonics was so fluid and effortless, we sometimes wondered if he takes a whole new approach to the instrument. The guitar sound and effects choices sounded very well thought out, and on most of the tracks, Levy dials back the gain enough so that he doesn't completely kill dynamics and pick attack. Levy shows us less is indeed more and delivers passionate and tasteful performances throughout.

The disk does suffer slightly from a case of ADD. It takes you from great hooks and simply stated themes (opening track) to all out shred (the title track), to the swagger of the song, "Fuzzy Feelin'." These examples could each set the mood and theme for entire records unto themselves because they are so distinct from one another. Although we think the playing is fantastic throughout, the CD at times seems to have a lack of cohesiveness.  The song, "For The Hate Of The Devil" seems to encompass EVERY mood imaginable, and it's pretty out there in terms of trying to pigeonhole it into a category. We'd have to simply call it "Udi." To Levy's further credit, though, throughout the wide variety of stylistic ideas presented on the album, he never sounds generic and his fingerprint and uniqueness is present from start to finish.

There are virtually no sounds on this CD to speak of other than Guitar, bass and drums, and the mix is presented intelligibly and professionally. We definitely appreciate the dynamic content of the mix, placed delicately where needed and like a sledgehammer where appropriate as well. Levy had set out to show the world there are no boundaries between rock, fusion, shred and jazz, and we think Addictive Substance gets his point across loud and clear. 

—BS


 
Blackfield V
Genre:

Melodic progressive rock, pop

Musicianship: 4.0
Songwriting: 4.0
Production & Engineering: 3.5
Vibe: 4.0
Overall Rating: 4 Stars3.89

Blackfield — VThe melodic progressive rock group helmed by Steven Wilson and Aviv Geffen is back with their most spectacular album yet. Many fans were concerned about the fate of the band as Steven Wilson's solo career became extremely encompassing time-wise, resulting in minimal contributions to Blackfield IV and only a few performances with the group on the subsequent tour. Happily, it was just a matter of timing, and the duo share equal billing on Blackfield V, which is easily the finest body of work the group has released to date.

In our songbook, Steven Wilson and Aviv Geffen are today's equivalent of Simon and Garfunkel, a fantastic duo who create dreamy, thought provoking songs rich in splendor, from the fantastic orchestration to the vocal harmonies to the expert musical performances from their stellar band.

After an orchestral opening performed by the London Sessions Orchestra, we were immediately captivated by "Family Man," a mid-tempo melodic rock song with an obvious Deadwing-era Porcupine Tree vibe, and by the time the song "Sorrys" captivated us with its acoustic guitar-driven storytelling and vocal harmonies in the heartbreaking chorus, we knew this was going to be a stand-out record that ranks as one of the best that either of these prolific songwriters has ever crafted.

Wilson and Geffen share guitar, keyboard, and vocal duties, and are once again supported by the incredible keyboard player, Eran Mitelman, and ace drummer, Tomer Z.

"Lately" is another driving rock song that hearkens back to the lighter, melodic side of Porcupine Tree, but overall, sonically, this is unmistakably a Blackfield record, especially on tracks like "Undercover Heart" and "October." We were also blown away by "Lonely Soul," a downtempo dubstep track with haunting female vocals and vintage electric piano set against electronic drum loops that would have felt right at home on the Marillion Marbles record. We wouldn't be surprised to hear this song turn up licensed in numerous television shows, though if it were the first track you heard, you might never guess that it was the work of this amazing band. The album closer, "From 44 to 48," has a dreamy, melancholy vibe with more Wilson/Geffen harmonized vocal work, that leaves you yearning for more.

Blackfield V has rightfully earned a place in our most active play lists. In the way that great '70s records captivated you from story beginning to end, V is up there with the finest rock albums that straddle a fine line between progressive rock and more contemporary fare. Fans of artists ranging from Pink Floyd to the Moody Blues to ELO would be wise to purchase this record immediately. Existing Blackfield and Steven Wilson/Porcupine Tree fans will no doubt be enjoying this release from the moment it ships, nodding their heads in agreement with this review.

—SK


 
Def Leppard — And There Will Be A Next Time – Live From Detroit
Genre:

AOR

Musicianship: 3.5
Songwriting: 4.0
Production & Engineering: 3.0
Vibe: 3.0
Overall Rating: 3.5 Stars3.38

Def Leppard — And There Will Be A Next Time – Live From DetroitComing up on their 40th anniversary, you'd have to live under a rock or have one foot in the grave to not be familiar with at least seven songs on Def Leppard's new double live CD/DVD, And There Will Be A Next Time – Live From Detroit. Both filmed and recorded on July 15 2016, the concert captures many of Def Leppard's timeless hits from back-to-back diamond records, Pyromania and Hysteria. Sprinkled in are some other classic hits and a few songs from their more recent records.

Given the slick production value of their biggest hits, recreating them live has always been challenging for Def Leppard, but here, they do a pretty decent job of it. The guitar work was as expected: Phil Collen and Vivian Campbell did a spectacular job in keeping the spirit of the hits alive and well, while drummer Rick Allen and bassist Rick Savage provided the unmistakable rhythm section that has defined the band for decades.

Vocally, this one isn't quite as strong as 2013's excellent Viva! Hysteria, though it is mostly decent. We appreciate how Joe Elliot has selectively picked the right high-pitched parts to retain, while changing some of the less significant bits—high pitched singers don't get to belt out all the high parts forever. And, we enjoyed Elliot's tone overall. However, his delivery sometimes fell short, particularly on "Love Bites" and "Hysteria."

We loved the extra hard swing on "Rocket," and the playful, effortless guitar assault on "Lets Get Rocked" was great. The true diehards will treasure "Switch 625," a fantastic instrumental they have performed live frequently. The somewhat grittier approach also worked well on "Let It Go," a driving guitar number from yesteryear.

Had this been sold as a concert DVD with bonus audio CDs, we would have told Def Leppard fans to jump right on it, because the concert footage is great high-definition stuff, and it really shows how these guys are still on top of their game decades later. But it's actually sold as a double-live CD with a bonus Blu-ray DVD in the package. No matter how you look at it, the band's latest live release offers a great collection of classic hits as well as some newer songs, and they mostly deliver an outstanding performance, with or without the visuals. Fans should pick this one up and… well… get rocked!

—BS and SK


 
Principe Valiente — Oceans
Genre:

Goth, Dark Pop, Shoegaze

Musicianship: 3.5
Songwriting: 3.5
Production & Engineering: 3.0
Vibe: 4.0
Overall Rating: 3.5 Stars3.5

Principe Valiente — OceansDreamy synth pop—assuming you like your dreams dark and haunting! And… sprinkled with jangly guitars! Sweden's Principe Valiente take you on a trip down memory lane with their third album, Oceans. Imagine a band influenced by artists such as The Cure, The Church, The Doves, Peter Murphy, and New Order, and you'll find yourself just as in love with Principe Valiente as we've become.

From the opening track, "Wildest Flowers," we were hooked with the Joshua Tree-era guitars layered atop a wash of bubbly synth textures and the brooding, baritone voice of Fernando Honorato (who also plays bass in the band). If Bauhaus had a reunion and Peter Murphy was unavailable, here's their obvious replacement. Moving on to the guitar-period New Order inspired track, "When I Learned to Crawl," we were floored by the emotional impact this music was having. And it didn't let up, through eight goth and new wave-inspired songs that left us wanting more after the epic closer, "Monsters of the Sea" came to an end and we had to wipe the black eyeliner from our teary eyes.

Guitarist Jimmy Ottosson has a great vibe that combines the best of the Edge's early years with Robert Smith's vibe, while keyboardist Rebecka Johansson does a great job laying down the somber mood and overall uneasiness. Joakim Janthe on drums rounds out the quartet.

If the gothic side of '80s new wave stirs your soul and imagination, this record is going to get a lot of play in your collection this summer and beyond.

—SK


 
What We're Watching
Madonna — Rebel Heart Tour
Genre:

Pop

Musicianship: 3.5
Songwriting: 2.5
Production & Engineering: 4.0
Vibe: 3.0
Overall Rating: 3 Stars3.25

Madonna, Rebel Heart TourThe Rebel Heart Tour concert DVD/Blu-ray and CD is fantastic in its own right, but it's definitely a polarizing release for Madonna fans depending on your age. Focused primarily around Madonna's 13th studio record, Rebel Heart, this concert event is extremely short on classic Madonna material and full of her most recent songs, many of which her life-long fans are relatively unfamiliar with.

The performance is a tremendous theatrical production, and the video production is as much of a visual treat as the concert experience must have been. However, despite her pioneering pop work in the '80s and early '90s, most of Madonna's recent songs fall into the disposable club music category… big on beats and loops, formulaic, short on memorable songwriting and expressive performance.

There are a lot of backing tracks at play in the show, and it was a bit annoying watching Madonna perform one part while listening to her prerecorded voice covering other parts including lead vocals. That said, the gem of the concert—and a truly fantastic number—was the acoustic rock performance of "Rebel Heart," easily one of the best songs Madonna has written in the past decade (and perhaps one of her finest and most personal songs, ever).

While much of the musical performance credit must be directed at the band's musical director, Kevin Antunes, and second keyboardist Ric'key Pageot, a big shout out goes to the unsung hero of this tour—guitarist Monte Pittman. Yes, the shredder. His acoustic work in particular on various songs during the show was fantastic, and despite all of the electronics at play, his clean, funky guitar parts and occasional lead work were also on display throughout the show. We love when players like Pittman reveal the depth of their capabilities by covering vastly different styles of play than their most familiar work. We wish this concert video showed a bit more of the actual band, but this show was clearly all about Madonna the performer, not Madonna the classic hit maker. To her credit, though, she does a fine job with acoustic guitar and ukulele here and there.

If you're a millennial, perhaps you'll enjoy this ninety minute club spectacular. But if you're a fan of classic Madonna, you may not get past the second or third song before growing bored. Instead, if you're over 35, get your hands on a copy of the classic Blond Ambition Tour, 1990.  In that concert, you'll see the band integrated into the stage show and find Madonna truly singing her ass off, along with demonstrating all of the other performance hallmarks that earn her high praise for being one hell of a performer. Madge, we love you. Now please stop chasing trends and start setting them again.

—SK


 
 
 
   
             
             
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